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Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.
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Location:

United States

Description:

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Language:

English


Episodes

Gluten-Free Restaurant Foods Are Often Mislabeled

4/18/2019
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One in three gluten-free dishes tested at restaurants contained gluten—especially GF pizzas and pastas. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:38

What Chickens Can Teach Hearing Researchers

4/17/2019
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At an event honoring Nobel and Kavli Prize winners, neuroscientists James Hudspeth and Robert Fettiplace talked about the physiology of hearing and the possibility of restoring hearing loss.

Duration:00:03:17

Nobelist Says System of Science Offers Life Lessons

4/16/2019
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At an event honoring Nobel and Kavli Prize winners, economist Paul Romer talked about how the social system of science offers hope for humanity and for how we can live with each other.

Duration:00:03:13

Squeezed Potassium Atoms Straddle Liquid and Solid

4/12/2019
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At extreme pressures, potassium atoms can be both liquid and solid at the same time, a phase of matter known as "chain melt." Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:03

Urban Coyote Evolution Favors the Bold

4/11/2019
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Coyotes become fearless around people in just a few generations—which isn’t good for their longterm co-existence with humans in cities. Jason G. Goldman reports.

Duration:00:03:38

Computers Turn an Ear on New York City

4/10/2019
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NYU’s “Sounds of New York City” project listens to the city—and then, with the help of citizen scientists, teaches machines to decode the soundscape. Jim Daley reports.

Duration:00:02:09

Whitening Strips Alter Proteins in Teeth

4/9/2019
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Hydrogen peroxide in whitening treatments penetrates enamel and dentin, and alters tooth proteins. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:21

Infrared Light Offers a Cooler Way to Defrost

4/8/2019
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Light tuned to a specific frequency warms ice more than water—which could come in handy for defrosting delicate biological samples. Adam Levy reports.

Duration:00:02:25

Spider Monkeys Optimize Jungle Acoustics

4/5/2019
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The monkeys lower the pitch of their "whinnies" when they're far from the rest of their group, which might help the calls travel further through jungle foliage. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:05

Tennessee Whiskey Relies on Missing Ingredients

4/3/2019
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Food chemists precisely measured how charcoal filtration contributes to Tennessee whiskey's smoother flavor. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:24

There's a Word for Today

4/1/2019
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English lacks some words that other languages pack with meaning.

Duration:00:02:25

Bumblebee Queens Prefer Layovers to Nonstop Flights

3/28/2019
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Scientists tracked bumblebee queens with radar when they emerged from hibernation and found the bees take only brief flights en route to a new nest. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:34

Scenic City Sights Linked to Higher Happiness

3/27/2019
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Tracking the location and mood of 15,000 people, researchers found that scenic beauty was linked to happiness—including near urban sights like bridges and buildings. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:13

Tech's Brain Effect: It's Complicated

3/25/2019
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We don't yet know what the immersion in technology does to our brains, but one neuroscientist says the answer is likely to be that there's good, there's bad, and it's complex.

Duration:00:02:52

Daylight Brings Toxic Beetles Together for Safety

3/22/2019
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During daylight hours, hundreds of bombardier beetles of multiple species will congregate together to more effectively ward off any predators not afraid of a lone beetle's toxic spray.

Duration:00:02:34

Solar Jets Cause Standing Waves in Earth's Magnetic Field

3/19/2019
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When jets of charged particles from the sun hit our magnetosphere, some of the ensuing ripples travel toward the northern and southern poles and get reflected back. The resulting interference allows standing waves to form, like on a drumhead.

Duration:00:02:58

Sing Solo for Higher Fidelity

3/18/2019
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By tracking duetting choir singers, researchers found that when an individual singer's pitch drifts off tune their partner’s tend to too. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:51

Edible Insect Breeding Led to Larger but Not Necessarily Better Larvae

3/14/2019
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Researchers aiming to lower the cost of mealworms were able to double the worms' size, but the larger larvae had fewer eggs and weaker offspring. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:09

Busting Earth-Bound Asteroids a Bigger Job Than We Thought

3/12/2019
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A new model suggests smashing killer space rocks with insufficient force could let gravity pull the pieces back together. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:51

Weekday–Weekend Sleep Imbalance Bad for Blood Sugar Regulation

3/11/2019
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Weekday sleep deprivation with weekend make-up sleeping seems to be worse for blood sugar control than even chronic sleep deprivation alone.

Duration:00:03:21