The Economist: All Audio-logo

The Economist: All Audio

The Economist

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.
More Information

Location:

London, United Kingdom

Networks:

The Economist

Description:

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

Language:

English


Episodes

The Economist asks: Renée Fleming

4/19/2019
More
Anne McElvoy goes backstage at New York’s newest arts centre, The Shed, to talk to the Grammy and Polar music prize-winning soprano. They discuss bending the rules of genre and gender opposite Ben Whishaw in “Norma Jeane Baker of Troy”. Also, why opera isn’t in trouble and how to reclaim the title of “diva” for the 21st century

Duration:00:24:15

Planes, trains and automobiles: the travails of travel

4/19/2019
More
Easter weekend is a busy travel time for the many people who celebrate it. If you’re lucky, it means some time off work. But you might be unlucky, and travel through a terrible airport (we talk about the world’s worst). Or perhaps you’ll splash out and take one of the many sleeper train services that are cropping up (we discuss why train travel is such a draw, particularly for artists). Or you might get stuck in traffic (we visit the places where traffic jams are seen as opportunity rather...

Duration:00:23:05

Editor’s Picks: April 18th 2019

4/18/2019
More
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the trouble with tech unicorns. These billion-dollar businesses seem to have it all—except a path to high profits. Next, why did a fire at Notre Dame cathedral provoke more global grief than the recent deadly floods in Mozambique? (9:54) And, why Pakistan risks exterminating a bird that lays golden eggs (15:23)

Duration:00:20:39

[Redacted]: the Mueller report

4/18/2019
More
Today the report by Robert Mueller, the special counsel who investigated Russian links to the Trump administration, will be released—mostly. What lies behind the redactions, and what investigations are still to play out? Politicians have dabbled in comedy for decades, but comedians who take up politics are an increasingly potent force. And, why Pakistani citizens don’t much mind that their local doctor might be a total quack.

Duration:00:21:38

Babbage: Am-AI-zon

4/17/2019
More
Amazon’s use of artificial intelligence has long outstripped Facebook and Google. Just how ingrained is AI at Amazon? Also, journalist and author David Wallace Wells explains the diminishing optimism of the climate change movement. And, how natural disasters fade from collective memory. Kenneth Cukier hosts

Duration:00:26:44

Roads to success: Indonesia’s election

4/17/2019
More
Joko Widodo, the incumbent president, is expected to win today’s vote, after a people-pleasing term tackling the country’s infrastructure. But there are worrying signs about how Jokowi would continue to rule. As a herd of “unicorns” stampedes toward stockmarkets, their business models don’t look so sure-footed. And, a battle is heating up as hotpot, a spicy Chinese dish, spreads globally.

Duration:00:22:22

Money talks: Big bank theory

4/16/2019
More
America’s largest banks reported earnings this week. Bank of America’s chief executive, Brian Moynihan, tells Anne McElvoy why he is bullish about the American economy and justifies his pay package. Also, can Goldman Sachs reinvent itself in the shadow of a scandal? And, Tiger Woods’s stroke of genius—for the business of golf. Simon Long hosts

Duration:00:24:26

And then, silence: a Paris icon burns

4/16/2019
More
Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, was already battling the flames of national protest when fire broke out at the Notre Dame cathedral. Will the tragedy, and Mr Macron’s leadership, bring the country together? America’s armed forces often don’t know how many civilians are killed in its air-strike campaigns—but that’s changing, thanks to help from some of the Pentagon’s loudest critics. And, the Trump administration’s cancellation of a deal for Cuban baseball players won’t stop them making...

Duration:00:19:35

Modi’s operandi: India’s enormous election

4/15/2019
More
The world’s largest democratic exercise is under way. Prime Minister Narendra Modi looks likely to win on a divisive platform about Hindu nationalism and Pakistani aggression—even if those aren’t voters’ biggest concerns. Social-media companies are increasingly under the microscope of regulators; we take a look at the seemingly intractable problem of policing online content. And, pole-dancing is trying to shed its seedy image. But can it also develop into a global sport?

Duration:00:22:08

The Economist asks: Preet Bharara

4/12/2019
More
Anne McElvoy asks the former United States attorney for the powerful Southern District of New York whether the law can still do justice in America. He explains the failure to prosecute any Wall St executives after the financial crisis and his concern about how politicised the Mueller report has become. And, Mr Bharara reveals what crime he would be tempted to commit and why he loves mafia movies.

Duration:00:31:54

Bashir and present danger: Sudan’s coup

4/12/2019
More
A protest movement that began in December at last brought Sudan’s military brass on board. The country’s cycle of dictatorship and democracy may be repeating itself. Bitcoin just turned ten, but it’s still far from fulfilling its promise to upend the financial system—we examine its fundamental shortcomings. And, the human family tree got bigger this week, but as new data flood in the murkier the human-evolution story seems to get.

Duration:00:23:40

Editor’s Picks: April 11th 2019

4/11/2019
More
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, mass protests have ousted Sudan’s dictator. The big question now is who will succeed him. Our Lexington columnist argues that Donald Trump is a pro wrestler masquerading as commander-in-chief (7:54). And kidney donors are wanted, dead or alive—we consider how to persuade more of the living to donate (15:39)

Duration:00:28:56

Brussels’ doubts: another Brexit delay

4/11/2019
More
Britain now has a new Brexit deadline: the end of October. But those negotiations magnified divisions within the European Union that Brexit is revealing—and causing. We visit one of the Chinese towns whose governments are running social experiments, rating people and businesses on their trustworthiness. And, a chat with Dame Stephanie Shirley, a pioneering programmer since before it was a male-dominated field.

Duration:00:22:09

Babbage: Hypersonic Boom

4/10/2019
More
America, China and Russia are developing long range, gliding missiles that travel at speeds greater than Mach 5. What are the threats and safeguards? Also, Dame Stephanie Shirley, the programmer who set up Britain’s first all-female software company in 1962, gives advice to women in tech today. And, how to knit a sports car with carbon fibre. Kenneth Cukier hosts

Duration:00:19:31

Bibi got back: Israel’s election

4/10/2019
More
Binyamin Netanyahu looks set to win a fifth term as prime minister. How will his policies affect negotiations about some of the most contested land on Earth? Meanwhile in space, Israel’s Beresheet probe is set to land on the Moon—but the recent spate of lunar landings is more about national flag-planting than it is about science. And, how will economies adjust as the old increasingly outnumber the young? Additional audio courtesy of NASA. Additional music "Fanfare" courtesy of Kevin MacLeod.

Duration:00:19:28

Money talks: Banking on independence

4/9/2019
More
It’s all change at the European Central Bank with its president, Mario Draghi, set to depart, along with two senior board members. As debate rumbles in America around central-bank independence, can new leadership at the ECB navigate the political shoals? Also, Airbus’s new boss seeks to capitalise as Boeing flounders. And, can the exorbitant cost of cross-border remittances be brought down? Simon Long hosts

Duration:00:20:26

The new mediocre: the world economy

4/9/2019
More
The International Monetary Fund releases its global-growth forecast today. Expect news of a downgrade, but not recession: low growth has become the status quo. We join international forces in Burkina Faso, where African troops are being trained to contain a growing risk of jihadism. And, why is it that concern about climate-change comes and goes?

Duration:00:20:23

Tripoli threat: a warlord’s bid to take Libya

4/8/2019
More
As rebel forces advance on Tripoli and American troops withdraw, we look at the Libyan general leading the march, and at the country’s fractured politics. There’s evidence that Facebook’s advertisement algorithms discriminate on the basis of race and gender. But who’s to blame, and how to fix it? And, the tricky business of making slot machines appeal to a generation of gamers.

Duration:00:21:34

The Economist asks: Juan Manuel Santos

4/5/2019
More
Anne McElvoy asks the former president of Colombia whether the country can sustain a lasting peace with the left-wing FARC guerrilla group. They discuss the best way to tackle the global drug trade and why Venezuela’s dictator, Nicolás Maduro, needs a “golden bridge” to give up power peacefully

Duration:00:26:22

Theresa looks left: Brexit negotiations

4/5/2019
More
Having seemingly exhausted options within her own party, Prime Minister Theresa May is now trying to strike an EU divorce deal with Jeremy Corbyn, the head of the opposition. We profile the hard-left Labour leader. This weekend marks 25 years since one of history’s most horrifying campaigns of slaughter; our correspondent reflects on Rwanda, then and now. And, a prominent scientist seeks a molecule that confers all of the fun of alcohol, but none of the risks.

Duration:00:24:02